Musing about Museums

As it’s Museum Week, and I happened to go to three museums/exhibitions, and I’m a history student, it seems like an appropriate time to blog about museums.  Terrible, I know, but for a long time I wasn’t the biggest fan of museums.  I mean, I thought they were alright, and I even did some volunteering for a couple of museum services, but I had trouble shaking off the old ‘school’ mentality of having to memorise everything I saw in case I was tested on it later.  It’s only as I’ve got older that I’ve moved into the position of thinking about objects in museums, and knowledge for its own sake (incidentally, I also read more non-fiction now).

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Introversion, Confidence, and ‘Performing‘

Make no mistake - I’m a dyed-in-the-wool, card-carrying introvert.  I’m the person who relates to all the fridge-magnet pictures on Facebook and cartoons on Tumblr about finding social interaction exhausting and needing to hide in my cave sometimes, while not necessarily being ‘shy’.  But my chosen career path requires me to teach, network and speak at conferences, so I can’t hide all the time.  And you know what?  Even though I’m wiped out by these activities, I’m not bad at them.

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Only Children vs. School Sports

A lot of the literature I’ve come across, old and new, suggests that only children are/were rather hopeless at team sports, largely on the basis that by not experiencing ‘rough and tumble’ with other children and fair, consistent rules at home before they started school, they were ‘unclubbable’, timid, and resisted games that they didn’t have a higher-than-average chance of winning.  My preliminary research using autobiographies shows that while some only children did have this experience, a substantial number reported that they enjoyed school sports, or otherwise had mixed experiences of them.  Additionally, some sibling children had negative experiences of school sports that echoed those expected of only children.

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Further Adventures in NVivo

I’ve finally read all the control group autobiographies and listened to all the control group oral histories, so now I can concentrate on something I personally find a lot more fun and stimulating - actually analysing my data!  In the last few days I’ve been using Nvivo to code the last of the autobiographies and put together my Social History Society conference paper.  Some people like it for the charts and graphics you can produce with it, but I prefer to use it as a practical digital alternative to highlighters and sticky labels.  So what have I been doing with Nvivo and the autobiographies?

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Assorted Thoughts on Sulloway's 'Born To Rebel'

This week I mainly read Born To Rebel, by Frank J. Sulloway.  I probably should have read it a lot earlier, but I didn’t know it existed before, which was kind of prohibitive.  Anyway, Sulloway spent 20 years collecting and analysing biographical data about people like scientists and politicians, and found out that, in the main, firstborns tend to be conservative in their outlook, whereas laterborns tend towards radicalism in a bid to carve out their own niche in the family and avoid ‘being kicked out of the nest’ (basically, it’s a Darwinian theory).  He also gave a whole bunch of circumstances which create exceptions to this rule, such as age gaps and radical parents (firstborns ally themselves with their parents, apparently).  He didn’t say much about only children, apart from that they’re wildcards who can go either way.  I can get on board with that one, but despite all the mathematic proofs he gave for the firstborns and lastborns, I spent a lot of the book feeling quite critical and thinking ‘I don’t think I can get on board with this.’

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